THROWBACK THURSDAY: Etruscan Fashion

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Etruscan Fashion

These guys basically stole it from the Greeks who, if you remember our last THROWBACK THURSDAY, took a cue from the Egyptians. 

The Etruscans were a civilization that flourished circa 800 to the third century BCE. As James would say 

What did the Etruscans ever do except invent everything that we think the Romans invented. Like the aqueduct.
— - James Haag, could totally find Rome on a map

Similar to the other ancient civilizations, much of what we know comes from the media they produced, such as art, architecture, and the occasional writing by a contemporary. Much knowledge of the Etruscans was lost due to their eventual assimilation in to Rome, but they were diligent historians in their funerary complexes (those wannabe Egyptians back at it again with funny funerary) and created ornate paintings that documented their extravagant clothing. 

Again, similar to the Greeks, the Etruscans weaved clothing and textiles at home. With the advent of more modern technology, and we mean this in the sense of it's 750 BCE and not literally every tool needs to made of bronze, the Etruscans were able to make manufacturing centers. They used wool for their outer wear and more light weight linen for their inner garments. 

Now that I have thoroughly bored you with the details of their history, here is a very brief overview of their style.

The Etruscans took long pieces of fabric and draped them loosely around the body, much in the same fashion as the Greeks and the Egyptians before them. They were noted for their wool and linen production as well as the fact that it was not always women who did the weaving. 

They favored highly decorated clothing as well as soft pointed hats in much the same style as their predecessors in the Near East. As discussed in the Ancient Greek post, the Etruscans favored the Chiton and the Himation with a red or black border.  

Clothing for both men and women varied widely in cut and color as demonstrated in their artwork. Different classes has different access to dyes, a trend that would be continued when Rome eventually co opted all of the Etruscan culture.

A good, detailed review of Etruscan Fashion can be found here

Instead of doing the history of Roman fashion next week, we are going to do a book review of a fashion history book that I truly love. To give you an idea of Roman Fashion: its 50% Greek. 50% Etruscan. 100 % stolen from other cultures and "adopted" as their own. 

SOURCE

FRIDAY FEATURE: What We're Loving

FRIDAY FEATURE: What We're Loving

WOMAN CRUSH WEDNESDAY: Rodarte

WOMAN CRUSH WEDNESDAY: Rodarte